The Keats-Shelley Podcast
How do you solve a problem like Maria Cotterell? The story of John Keats, the Maria Crowther and his Final Voyage

How do you solve a problem like Maria Cotterell? The story of John Keats, the Maria Crowther and his Final Voyage

July 15, 2021

On 15th July 1821, a 19-year-old woman named Maria Cotterell died in Naples of consumption. History may well have forgotten her, if she hadn't happen to sail to Italy from England on a ship called the Maria Crowther. Her fellow passengers included a middle-aged woman, Mrs Pidgeon, a 26-year-old painter, Joseph Severn, and a 24-year-old poet named John Keats. 

We tell Maria's story in this episode of The Keats-Shelley Podcast - including new discoveries about her death, her brief encounter with Keats and her treatment by posterity.

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Mark Wallinger in Conversation: John Keats, Writ in Water and Rome

Mark Wallinger in Conversation: John Keats, Writ in Water and Rome

July 9, 2021

We talk to Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger about his life and career - and more specifically, his love of John Keats. Read the rest of this entry »

Is Keats’ nightingale immortal after all? Simon Barnes in Conversation Part 2

Is Keats’ nightingale immortal after all? Simon Barnes in Conversation Part 2

July 8, 2021

Part two of our conversation with Simon Barnes, the award-winning sportswriter, revered bird lover and Chair of 2020 and 2021's Keats-Shelley Prizes. Read the rest of this entry »

Why are nightingales and skylarks so poetic? Simon Barnes in Conversation Part 1

Why are nightingales and skylarks so poetic? Simon Barnes in Conversation Part 1

July 5, 2021

In this first of two episodes recorded in 2019, we talk to Simon Barnes, the award-winning sportswriter, revered birder and Chair of 2020 and 2021's Keats-Shelley Prizes. Read the rest of this entry »

Poetry Reading: Senbazuru by Joyce Chen - Winner of 2020’s Young Romantics Poetry Prize

Poetry Reading: Senbazuru by Joyce Chen - Winner of 2020’s Young Romantics Poetry Prize

April 5, 2021

Joyce Chen's Senbazuru won 2020's Young Romantic Poetry Prize.

The poem was read by Dinah Roe, Reader in 19th Century Literature at Oxford Brookes University, as part of our online awards ceremony.

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Poetry Reading: Indian Paradise Flycatcher by Pascale Petit - Winner of 2020’s Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize

Poetry Reading: Indian Paradise Flycatcher by Pascale Petit - Winner of 2020’s Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize

April 5, 2021

Pascale Petit's Indian Paradise Flycatcher won 2020's Keats-Shelley Poetry PrizeThe poem was read by Will Kemp, one of the Poetry Prize Judges, as part of our online announcement. Read the rest of this entry »

John Keats and Rome’s Protestant Cemetery. A conversation with Nicholas Stanley-Price

John Keats and Rome’s Protestant Cemetery. A conversation with Nicholas Stanley-Price

March 24, 2021

In this episode of our 'Writ in Water' series, the Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast talks to Nicholas Stanley-Price about the 300-year history of the Non-Catholic Cemetery in Rome. Read the rest of this entry »

How did John Keats influence Christina Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites? A Conversation with Dr Dinah Roe

How did John Keats influence Christina Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites? A Conversation with Dr Dinah Roe

March 11, 2021

How did John Keats influence Christina Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites? In this episode of our Writ in Water series inspired by John Keats’ epitaph – ‘Here lies one whose name was writ in water’ – we talk to Dr Dinah Roe about Christina Rossetti, her sonnet 'On Keats' - and more widely about how Keats influenced both her and the Pre-Raphaelite artists. 

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ This Living Hand and Where be ye going, you Devon maid? To mark the bicentenary of Keats’ death 23rd February 2021.

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ This Living Hand and Where be ye going, you Devon maid? To mark the bicentenary of Keats’ death 23rd February 2021.

March 7, 2021

On 23rd February 2021, the 200th anniversary of John Keats' death in Rome, the Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast recorded a conversation with Dr Dinah Roe about Christina Rossetti's sonnet 'On Keats', which quotes his epitaph 'Here lies one whose name was writ in water'. Read the rest of this entry »

Why did Dante Gabriel Rossetti love John Keats’ Cockney rhymes? Reading and analysis by Dr Dinah Roe

Why did Dante Gabriel Rossetti love John Keats’ Cockney rhymes? Reading and analysis by Dr Dinah Roe

March 2, 2021

In this mini Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast, Dr Dinah Roe reads and discusses two poems by Dante Gabriel Rossetti that quote John Keats' epitaph 'Here lies one whose name was writ in water'. The first was also a sonnet ('John Keats'); the second a fragment included in a letter to the other Rossetti brother, William Michael. Read the rest of this entry »

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