The Keats-Shelley Podcast
Poetry Reading: Senbazuru by Joyce Chen - Winner of 2020’s Young Romantics Poetry Prize

Poetry Reading: Senbazuru by Joyce Chen - Winner of 2020’s Young Romantics Poetry Prize

April 5, 2021

Joyce Chen's Senbazuru won 2020's Young Romantic Poetry Prize.

The poem was read by Dinah Roe, Reader in 19th Century Literature at Oxford Brookes University, as part of our online awards ceremony.

Listen to Dinah discuss Christina Rossetti's 'On Keats' as part of our 'Writ in Water' series. Follow her on Twitter @preraphsrule

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Poetry Reading: Indian Paradise Flycatcher by Pascale Petit - Winner of 2020’s Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize

Poetry Reading: Indian Paradise Flycatcher by Pascale Petit - Winner of 2020’s Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize

April 5, 2021

Pascale Petit's Indian Paradise Flycatcher won 2020's Keats-Shelley Poetry Prize. The Chair of the Judging panel was Simon Barnes.

The poem was read by Will Kemp, one of the Poetry Prize Judges, as part of our online announcement.

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Writ in Water: John Keats and The Non-Catholic Cemetery in Rome: with Nicholas Stanley-Price

Writ in Water: John Keats and The Non-Catholic Cemetery in Rome: with Nicholas Stanley-Price

March 24, 2021

In this episode of our 'Writ in Water' series, the Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast talks to Nicholas Stanley-Price about the 300-year history of the Non-Catholic Cemetery in Rome. For poetry lovers, this is the place where both John Keats and PB Shelley are buried, not far from their friends Joseph Severn and Edward Trelawny, and also Shelley's 3-year-old son, William. 

But the Cemetery's story is far longer and broader than that of these Romantic graves, which is why Nicholas is the perfect guide to steer us from its origins in Testaccio to its modern history in 21st century Rome, from Keats' funeral to the vexed question of what to call the Protestant/Non-Catholic/Acattolico Cemetery/Cimitero.

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Writ in Water: Christina Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelite John Keats: A Conversation with Dr Dinah Roe

Writ in Water: Christina Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelite John Keats: A Conversation with Dr Dinah Roe

March 11, 2021

In this episode of our Writ in Water series inspired by John Keats’ epitaph – ‘Here lies one whose name was writ in water’ – we talk to Dr Dinah Roe about Christina Rossetti, her sonnet 'On Keats' - and more widely about how Keats influenced both her and the Pre-Raphaelite artists. 

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ ‘This living hand’ and ‘Where be ye going, you Devon Maid’ (23rd February 2021)

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ ‘This living hand’ and ‘Where be ye going, you Devon Maid’ (23rd February 2021)

March 7, 2021

On 23rd February 2021, the 200th anniversary of John Keats' death in Rome, the Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast recorded a conversation with Dr Dinah Roe about Christina Rossetti's sonnet 'On Keats', which quotes his epitaph 'Here lies one whose name was writ in water'. We finished around 10.30pm and to mark the occasion read two poems in Keats' honour: 'This living hand now warm and capable' and 'Where be ye going you Devon maid'.

Visit the Keats-Shelley Blog for more Prize Resources, including poems, articles and podcasts. Read the rest of this entry »

Writ in Water: Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Keats and Cockney Rhyming: with Dr Dinah Roe

Writ in Water: Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Keats and Cockney Rhyming: with Dr Dinah Roe

March 2, 2021

In this mini Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast, Dr Dinah Roe reads and discusses two poems by Dante Gabriel Rossetti that quote John Keats' epitaph 'Here lies one whose name was writ in water'. The first was also a sonnet ('John Keats'); the second a fragment included in a letter to the other Rossetti brother, William Michael. Read the rest of this entry »

Writ in Water, Glass and Lemon Juice: A Conversation with Professor Adam Smyth

Writ in Water, Glass and Lemon Juice: A Conversation with Professor Adam Smyth

February 10, 2021

John Keats' epitaph runs: 'Here lies one whose name was writ in water'. But what does it mean to write in water? And even more, what does it mean to write 'writ in water' on stone? Or is that in stone? 

Confused? We were, which is why in this episode of the Keats-Shelley Prize Podcast, we called Adam Smyth, Professor of English Literature at Balliol College, Oxford, and an expert in Material Texts: or the study of people writing with weird things on weird surfaces. Read the rest of this entry »

Erica Jong’s Writing Advice for Young Romantics

Erica Jong’s Writing Advice for Young Romantics

January 25, 2021

At the end of 2020, James Kidd of the Keats-Shelley Podcast talked to bestselling novelist Erica Jong about her life-long love of John Keats. 

During the conversation, which will be posted soon, we asked what advice she would give writers entering our Young Romantics Poetry and Essay competitions. 

A small warning: there is one mild expletive (in reference to bad drafts) near the start of Erica's advice.  

For more information visit our Young Romantics page. Read the rest of this entry »

Poetry Reading - John Keats’ Bright Star 1820: read by heart with analysis

Poetry Reading - John Keats’ Bright Star 1820: read by heart with analysis

December 31, 2020

Six years ago, we were challenged to learn John Keats' ode To Autumn by heart, and recite it to. To end 2020, we attempted the same trick with his great sonnet 'Bright Star'. Listen to our throaty rendition on this special, year-ending Keats-Shelley Podcast. Read the rest of this entry »

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ ‘In drear nighted December’

Poetry Reading: John Keats’ ‘In drear nighted December’

December 2, 2020

Reading and discussion of John Keats' 'In drear nighted December'. This is embedded in our new Google Earth map: The Life, Times and Places of John Keats.

Read the poem here. Read the rest of this entry »

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